Chiefs - Galafilm
Sitting Bull, Sioux Poundmaker, Cree Joseph Brant, Mohawk Black Hawk, Sauk Pontiac, Ottawa

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Neolin  (dates of birth and death unknown)
Names The Enlightened; The Delaware Prophet; The Impostor
Band Delaware (Lenni Lenape)
Highlights Preached a powerful doctrine calling for a return to traditional native ways
Pontiac used his message to unite tribes against the British
Biography
Neolin, whom the British called The Impostor, seemingly appeared out of nowhere. In 1762, he is recorded to have preached a new doctrine to his people, the Delaware (Lenni Lenape), who lived in what is now east-central Ohio.
Claiming he had learned the true way directly from the Great Creator - he condemned traditional spirituality, believing it to be inspired by evil spirits.
The Prophet spoke against drunkenness, disorderliness, and polygamy. He said native tribes should stop warring among themselves. Claiming he had learned the true way directly from the Great Creator - he condemned traditional spirituality, believing it to be inspired by evil spirits. Most of all, Neolin advocated an uncompromising return to traditional ways of life. Only by shunning all trade goods, including European cloth, tools, alcohol, and weaponry, he said, would native people gain the strength to resist European expansion into their territory.
Neolin's fame increased rapidly. Native people came from near and far to hear his message. Ottawa war chief Pontiac was an early convert. Pontiac used Neolin's message to unite the tribes against the British under his own leadership.
By 1766 Pontiac's resistance against the British had collapsed. The doctrine's adherents dwindled. The Delaware Prophet disappeared from the stage at about the same time. What later became of him is not known.
"You complain ... that the animals of the Forest are few and scattered ... You destroy them yourselves for their skins only and leave their bodies to rot or give the best pieces to the Whites. ... You must kill no more animals than are necessary to feed and clothe you."
Trout, Ottawa Prophet
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The Trout, also called Maya-Ga-Wy, was an Ottawa prophet on the scene in the early 1800s. He was noted for having carried on the legacy of Neolin and Pontiac, advocating the return to traditional ways as a means of combating European domination. His beliefs were rather extreme, not only condemning alcohol and the fur trade, but also the consumption of bread ("food of the Whites") and the wearing of hats.